Marie Marshall

Author. Poet. Editor.

Category: Uncategorized

I’m in a subjunctive mood…

I wasted a lot of time recently arguing with a blogger who had ‘learned the rules’ of English at school. My use of English was, according to him, ‘lazy’ because I broke some of these rules. No use my telling him I’m university-educated, that I have spent a lot of time examining historical texts and their linguistic usage, that I’m aware of every rule and rubric that the English language has been saddled with, and that I know full well which ones come from the natural eloquence of everyday speech and which ones were foisted on us despite that natural eloquence. No matter that I have followed and marvelled at the development of modern English from its Medieval roots to its present position as a vibrant, living World Language, with a host of attendant lects and sub-lects that handle every discourse, every social and ethnic specialness, every creative need. No, his schoolmarm knew better, and now so did he!

Aye, right.

Let me examine two of these rules and see how they stand up to scrutiny. Firstly, the question of ending a phrase or sentence with a preposition.

1“We are such stuff as dreams are made on,” says Prospero at the end of Shakespeare’s The Tempest, and the euphony of that phrase of feminine-ended tetrameter shines out of the dark of four centuries, reminding the audience of the essentially ephemeral existence of that redemptive fantasy and its characters.* Shakespeare was a genius of language; it was all he had to hold his audience with, in the days when CGI effects were not even dreamt of. And this phrase, shining like a candle, ends with a preposition.

Likewise the roll-call of drowned sailors making this wonderful piece of iambic pentameter:

‘Ten thousand men that fishes gnawed upon.’ (Richard III, 1.4.25)

But I over-egg the pudding, friends. Shakespeare ended sentences this way simply because that’s exactly how everyday English – the English of Kings and commoners alike – was spoken. So when King Henry V, wandering in disguise around the camp of the English army before the battle of Agincourt, is challenged to answer the question ‘Who servest thou under?’ he does not ‘correct’ his challenger’s question. And when, in As You Like It Rosalind asks Orlando ‘Who do you speak to?’ it raises no eyebrows, because it flows off the tongue of a native-speaker like water down a country rill. Moreover, as a king may not quibble at a question, and a well-bred lady may use a preposition as she pleases, a prince may speak of ‘the thousand shocks that flesh is heir to’ in his most famous soliloquy (Hamlet, 3.1.61-62).

2So, where did the rule to the contrary come from? Many consider that the attribution of Shakespeare’s usages not to one-part-observation one-part-inventiveness, but to ignorance and lack of education, started with John Dryden in the late 17c. Dryden was a scholar of Latin, and since in Latin it was impossible to end a sentence with a preposition, he decided it should be improper in English, usage or no usage.** Influential amongst his own circle though Dryden might have been, ‘Dryden’s Rule’ was not codified until the second half of the 18c, when Bishop Robert Lowth produced his A Short Introduction to English Grammar. 3But even he acknowledged that ending a sentence with a preposition was dominant ‘in common conversation’ and suited ‘very well the familiar style of writing.’ So not even Lowth would go as far as saying it should never be done!

Nevertheless, by the early 20c it became the norm amongst teachers of English in schools to preach up the banishment of prepositions from their natural place in colloquial speech. Notwithstanding that, the preposition knew its place better than the teachers did, and kept to it in every discourse except in the speech and writings of pedants. Even Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage referred to the preposition’s banishment as a ‘superstition’!

4At this point in the discussion of prepositions it is usual to cite Winston Spencer Churchill who, it is supposed, replied to a torturous memo from a civil servant, in which prepositions had been engineered away from the end of phrases to the extent that the prose resembled crazy-paving, ‘This is something up with which I will not put!’ However, nice though this piece of ridicule is, the story is apocryphal.

So, is it actually wrong to take prepositions away from the end of sentences? Well, no it isn’t. It is no more wrong than to banish them. As in all things to do with English usage the principle guidelines*** are: clarity, i.e. there should be no confusion, no ambiguity about what is meant; euphony, i.e. it should not sound ugly; emphasis, i.e. the placing of any word depends on how the phrase or sentence is nuanced, thus to say “Where are you going from?” can be used not only because of its colloquial currency, but because it may draw attention to the most important component of the question. 5Equally, when Abraham Lincoln drew the preposition away from the end of a sentence in his address at Gettysburg – ‘increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion’ – he knew precisely where the emphasis should fall in his rhetoric. Thus both are correct, in their own way, according to the context.

Clarity. Euphony, and emphasis are only guidelines, however, and I can think of many reasons why, for the sake of artistic effect, even they can be (carefully) discarded.

On to the next issue, the use of the double negative.

The blogger I was discussing my usage with seemed to be too busy reading his own prejudices to read what I was actually saying about this. It all came about because I deliberately used a negative word to negate a negative phrase I had lifted from him. I was in fact using two negatives to resolve to a positive. He couldn’t get his head round that, he couldn’t cope with any idea except that two negatives together were ‘wrong’. Yet the concept of two negatives resolving to a positive is actually straight-down-the-line schoolmarm English! I’ll leave that point there, as it needs no embellishment.

6There is, of course the question of using a double negative as an intensifier. Now, do I need to quote Shakespeare and Milton to anyone? It is usual for anyone who hears a usage in English that they think is ugly, ‘lazy’, or just new, to shake their head, wring their hands, and lament “Oh, the language of Shakespeare and Milton!” The thing is, both of these writers sometimes used double negatives as intensifiers. Oh yes they did!

Viola says of her heart, ‘And that no woman has, nor never none shall mistress be of it,’ (Shakespeare, Twelfth Night, 3.1.156-157) and actually I counted four in there!

‘Nor did they not perceive the evil plight in which they were,’ (Milton, Paradise Lost). This is an interesting example, as it has the common use of ‘nor’ as an intensifier at the beginning of a phrase. And by the way, yes, I spotted where Milton had placed his preposition. As I said, both are correct usage.

The difficulty that some readers have with such intensifiers is that, post-18c and the introduction of books like Lowth’s, their use has been identified with a lack of schooling. Whether that identification is a fair criterion to judge them is another matter. In my discussion with the blogger, I cited ‘African-American Vernacular English’ (AAVE), which is recognised by academic linguists as being a legitimate lect of English. Its usage is so ingrained, that it is not simply current but widely influential. Its origins are unclear, but it is probable that it drew its strongest characteristics not only from African speech-patterns but also from the speech-patterns of early English-American settlers. Certainly a very clear factor in its development was the generations-long deprivation of the African-American societal layer from formal education. However, in no way does that invalidate its legitimacy as a lect, in no way are its users inherently ‘lazy’ for using it. I find it highly ironic that ‘laziness’ should be an attribute so often applied to a people who for generations had to suffer slavery!

6In AAVE, as I said, the use of a double negative as an intensifier is very common. So, for example, when Ray Charles sang “I don’t need no doctor…” it was perfectly clear what he meant. Again – clarity. But my stubborn blogger again could not get his head round the fact that to use or not to use a double negative depended entirely on context, not on a supposed laziness or lack of education. Certainly not on my part.

So, is my own English usage ‘perfect’? Well, should I even be aiming for that? In this essay I have deliberately used colloquial forms which have been frowned at by generations of schoolmarms. I have used the singular they/their, I have ended sentences with prepositions, I have started sentences with conjunctions, I have mixed British and American criteria for double and single quotes, I have sprinkled this essay with all kinds of things that some readers may find questionable. But did you, at any time, not understand what I was saying? I doubt it. That’s because I know my English, I know what it does, I know how it’s used, and I know how to use it.

But no, my English has never been ‘perfect’. I headed this article ‘I’m in a subjunctive mood’. That’s because I have to confess that I wrestled with a particular grammatical issue for many years – the subjunctive.

In the English language, strictly speaking, verbs no longer have a subjunctive mood. English does, however, retain a few zombie elements of it, and for a long time I had a big, big blind spot about these elements. Were I to illustrate this by saying that, if I was you, I would read no further, then you would see what I was driving at. I said ‘Were I to illustrate this…’ and that is pure subjunctive, expressing something conditional. I said ‘if I was you’, which was pointed out to me by someone editing my work as being ‘wrong’. To my mind, the word ‘if’ was enough to carry the conditional sense, and the phrase ‘if I was you’ required no subjunctive form of the verb. However, I had never been pulled up on this issue until that editorial process. I checked up on the matter, and I found that ‘if I were you’ was generally regarded as being ‘correct’. Was this another of these arbitrary ‘rules’ that had been foisted on us in the 18c? That didn’t matter to me. What did matter was the question of register and discourse – for whom I wrote generally, and in what context. In that respect ‘if I were you’ would be better received, and actually I had to admit it sounded better to my ear when I spoke each over. It sounded right. It sounded right. It had the benefit of euphony, this use of a double – ha! – conditional.

Wonder of wonders, there’s a grammatical construction that you must double.

Interestingly, though, the way it had been put to me was that ‘if I was you’ was the way the idea was commonly expressed amongst users of English as a second language, in a particular country, and was regarded by many users of English as a first language in that country as the speech of the ill-educated. And there I think we have come full-circle!

__________

7* Humphrey Bogart’s final words in The Maltese Falcon – “The stuff that dreams are made of” – is in fact a misquotation. But that isn’t a problem, because there are many, many misquotes from Shakespeare, from the Bible, from other sources, floating freely out there. The English language is not poorer for them, it is probably richer.

** This is precisely why splitting an infinitive used to be considered incorrect – it was impossible in Latin, so it should be improper in English. See? Modern linguists consider that to be a silly, unnecessary rule, and I’m with them!

*** Inasmuch as rules are for the blind obedience of fools and the guidance of the wise.

 

 

How Tam o’ Shanter came to be written – a tale for Burns Night

A reprise of my Burns Night story!

Marie Marshall

detail of Faed's Tam

Was it a year ago now, since last we piped in the great chieftain o’ the pudding race, that we raised an amber dram, that we all gave a hearty slainte mhath! There was one braw lad whose eyes were twinkling with glee and single malt, who rose and recited – without a prompt – the auld tale of Tam o’ Shanter, the skellum the blethering, blustering, drunken blellum. Aye, aye, and how we laughed, how we all chorused “Weel done, Cutty Sark!” And how we cheered on old Tam was he whipped Maggie his mare towards Doon Water and the Brig, held our breath at the last loup of Nannie the witch to grab the mare’s tale as Tam won to the key-stane o’ the brig, and yes, how we let it all out with a big gasp when he was hame and free. More, how…

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Axe

Revisiting a short story of mine, in which a Caribbean-British girl moves to Glasgow and joins a girl-gang. There she learns about violence, love, laughter, and death.

More than one person has suggested it would make good cinema. That has set me thinking…

Marie Marshall

All the girls call me ‘Axe’. Tough name, but nah need fe aks me why, coz of me accent, ell-oh-ell!

They’re like to me – We were gonnay give you a kicking. Two days I’ve been in Glasgow, two days! I go out to a club, and these girls come over and they’re looking mean like they mean business, right. But the music is loud and the girl who’s doing all the talking has this accent, this Scottish accent, and she’s shouting over the music, and I’m like – What? What? And she’s back to me like – What? What? And then the music stops and all you can hear is her shouting what and me shouting what, and suddenly everyone’s laughing.

So the girl who’s doing all the talking, this is her to me – Come over to our table. And I’m like – Okay, cool. So we all…

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Our Sister, ‘Anon’.

virginia_woolf

… it is unthinkable that any woman in Shakespeare’s day should have had Shakespeare’s genius. For genius like Shakespeare’s is not born among labouring, uneducated, servile people. It was not born among the Saxons and the Britons. It is not born today among the working classes… Yet genius of a sort must have existed among women as it must have existed among the working classes. Now and again an Emily Brontë or a Robert Burns blazes out and proves its presence. But certainly it never got itself on to paper. When, however, one reads of a witch being ducked, of a woman possessed by devils, of a wise woman selling herbs, or even of a very remarkable man who had a mother, then I think we are on the track of a lost novelist, a suppressed poet, of some mute and inglorious Jane Austen, some Emily Brontë who dashed her brains out on the moor or mopped and mowed about the highways crazed with the torture that her gift had put her to. Indeed, I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman…

Virginia Woolf, A Room of One’s Own, 1929.

One thing we must never do, it occurs to me, is to dwell in the wise woman selling herbs or in the witch being ducked. It may be that women writers had to flounder, to experiment, to fail, to try again and fail better, because we had no literary tradition behind us, and that what was behind us was in any case overwhelmingly male. To dwell on that and in that situation is to hamper our creativity. As Virginia Woolf says later in A Room of One’s Own, ‘the whole of the mind must lie open’. By dwelling in the wise woman and the witch I mean becoming shackled to the idea of ourselves as feminist writers. The end of feminism in literature is that there should be no more feminism, just literature. The expansion of this avenue of thought into a broader vista runs thus: that liberation cannot be piecemeal, and if women have claimed a place in literature that does not stop the world of literature being a world of privilege. The unprivileged exist. While they exist we, exercising our ‘freedom’, are in fact not free; we are as bound by chains as they are, and they must be liberated before we can consider ourselves truly liberated, before we can enjoy with significant comfort our place in the literary world. Moreover we can never think of their liberation as anything within our gift, nor our tradition as something they must build on. We may invite them to stand where we stand but we must not assume that they will want to stand there. They may be standing somewhere else already. They will flounder, experiment, fail, try again and fail better; they will attach an ‘ism’ to what they are doing and, one day, detach it again. The sum of my argument is that liberation is total and inclusive. It exists in a world we can’t see and won’t recognise when it’s here. Expect some turbulence on the way.

Dance the Carmagnole!

Traditional (anon.), tr. Marie Marshall

Young Missus Veto said to me
She’d slit the throat of all Paree.
Young Missus Veto said to me
She’d slit the throat of all Paree.
But see the plan she laid
Spoilt by our cannonade!

Let’s dance the Carmagnole
– hear ‘em roar, hear ‘em roar!
All dance the Carmagnole

– hear how loud the cannons roar!

Old Mister Veto said to me a-Sansculottes-1793-jacob 2
He’d give his realm fidelity.
Old Mister Veto said to me
He’d give his realm fidelity.
But this he failed to do,
We’ll give no quarter too!

Let’s dance the Carmagnole
– hear ‘em roar, hear ‘em roar!
All dance the Carmagnole
– hear how loud the cannons roar!

Antoinette said “Let it pass
The common crowd falls on its arse.”
Antoinette said “Let it pass
The common crowd falls on its arse.”
But in the market-place
She fell flat on her face!

Let’s dance the Carmagnole
– hear ‘em roar, hear ‘em roar!
All dance the Carmagnole
– hear how loud the cannons roar!

Louis the King thought he had won
But we’re the champions, every one.
Louis the King thought he had won
But we’re the champions, every one.
Cry-baby Louis – weep
From your palace to the keep!

Let’s dance the Carmagnole
– hear ‘em roar, hear ‘em roar!
All dance the Carmagnole
– hear how loud the cannons roar!  

When Antoinette was shown her cell
She began to weep as well.
When Antoinette was shown her cell
She began to weep as well.
She fainted and fell down,
All because she’d lost her crown!

Let’s dance the Carmagnole
– hear ‘em roar, hear ‘em roar!
All dance the Carmagnole
– hear how loud the cannons roar!

The bloody Switzers* made a vow
They’d gun down our comrades now.
The bloody Switzers made a vow
They’d gun down our comrades now.
But look at how they prance,
Our bullets make ‘em dance!

Let’s dance the Carmagnole
– hear ‘em roar, hear ‘em roar!
All dance the Carmagnole

– hear how loud the cannons roar!

sans-culottesComrades, forever we’ll unite
No matter who comes here to fight.
Comrades, forever we’ll unite
No matter who comes here to fight.
Attack us if they dare,
We’ll give ‘em such a scare!

Let’s dance the Carmagnole
– hear ‘em roar, hear ‘em roar!
All dance the Carmagnole

– hear how loud the cannons roar!

Comrades, remember their renown,
The Sans-Culottes from our town.
Comrades, remember their renown,
The Sans-Culottes from our town.
We’ll raise a glass and sing,
The bells of freedom ring!

Let’s dance the Carmagnole
– hear ‘em roar, hear ‘em roar!
All dance the Carmagnole

– hear how loud the cannons roar!

__________

* ‘Switzers’ here refers to Swiss mercenaries in the pay of the King of France.

There are several variants of this song. The words have been translated very freely and are possibly more ‘jokey’ than the original. As with all the better-known songs of the French Revolutionary period, this is actually a very rousing piece of music. If you would like to sing along, you will find the tune here.

Thank you…

… to commenters on a recently-posted article here. For various reasons too boring to explain, it has been withdrawn.

‘What to do when Santa Claus comes a-knocking at your door’ and other weird stuff for kids.

I’ve been messing around lately seeing if I can write for a much younger readership than my usual target…

© Marie Marshall

© Marie Marshall

© Marie Marshall

© Marie Marshall

© Marie Marshall

© Marie Marshall

© Marie Marshall

© Marie Marshall

And the Winner Is:

the red ant

Blank bookcover with clipping path

Lupa by Marie Marshall

is the first of our Facebook Share contestants to move into the “Free Downloads Zone”.

The “Zone” will open on the 1st of October, so stay tuned…  A limited number of copies is going to become available for free download, from the P’kaboo website.

There is something immensely satisfying in being the first in something.  Well done, Marie!

Please boost the other books, too:

Visit this page and share books to move more into the “Zone”.


LupaTabika 1Almost Dead in SuburbiaMercury SilverBaa Baa Black BeltSolar Wind 1Solar Wind 2


Thank you for participating!

And now gipsika will steal away and prepare for her daughter’s 16th birthday, and a corporate gig she’s playing in Joburg next week.

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